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The History of Rosebery Park Baptist Church and Pokesdown

by Michelle Fogg (June 2021).
Creative Commons Licence
The History of Rosebery Park Baptist Church and Pokesdown by Michelle Fogg is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

The opinions expressed are the author’s personal views and do not necessarily represent the views of Rosebery Park Baptist Church.

Note about image copyrights:

There are four images in use on this website taken from J.A. Young booklets:

Morley Road chapel – Pokesdown and Iford Yesterday – on history page 2

Tramway depot – Pokesdown Past – on history page 2

Steam train, Bournemouth Belle – Pokesdown and Iford Yesterday – on history page 5

View of Pokesdown same as on Pokesdown Green sign – from front cover of ‘A History of Pokesdown: Part 2’ – used on page Pokesdown: the name.

J.A. Young is sadly no longer with us, and the organisation who published those booklets, Bournemouth Local Studies Publications, no longer exists. So there is no one to directly ask about permission to use images. The same or similar images are floating about the internet, with no known copyright holder.

There are some other images in use on this website where the original copyright holder is unknown.

These images are reproduced here solely for the purpose of interest and education, not for commercial gain in any way.

If we receive any complaints from an original copyright holder, who would like to see their image(s) removed, we will remove it (them) immediately.

For the majority of images on these history pages we do have specific permission to make use of them in this non-commercial, informative capacity.

The video, Why the name “Rosebery Park” Baptist Church?

Note A1.

Music bed: I Know Whom I Have Believed, arranged for saxophone trio ensemble, Arr Dana F. Everson, © 2000 Copyright by DAVID E. SMITH PUBLICATIONS All Rights Reserved; Made in U.S.A. from https://bibletruthmusic.com/product/i-know-whom-i-have-believed-saxophone-ensemble-quartet-instrumental-pdf-downloadable/

Waving hand (gif converted to wav) https://tenor.com/view/waving-hand-joypixels-hi-hello-hey-there-gif-17554626

Black and white photo of chapel – Morley Road Chapel, photo taken in 1910. From booklet by Young, J.A. (1996) Pokesdown and Iford Yesterday. Bournemouth Local Studies Publications, No. 700. ISBN 0 906287 80 4.

Newspaper article about building the chapel – Pokesdown, Christchurch Times, Saturday 30 April, page 5 https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/BL/0002170/18920430/048/0005

Photograph of Rosebery – courtesy of National Portrait Gallery

Archibald Philip Primrose, 5th Earl of Rosebery

© National Portrait Gallery, London

by Elliott & Fry
albumen cabinet card, 1886-1896
5 3/4 in. x 4 in. (146 mm x 103 mm) image size
Given by Royal College of Music, 1977
NPG x12551

from https://www.npg.org.uk/collections/search/portrait/mw122114/Archibald-Philip-Primrose-5th-Earl-of-Rosebery

Information about Rosebery and his wife- https://roseberyestates.co.uk/dalmeny-house/the-5th-earl

https://www.gov.uk/government/history/past-prime-ministers/archibald-primrose-5th-earl-of-rosebery

Picture of Hannah Rosebery – Late Countess of Rosebery,  Illustrated London News – Saturday 06 December 1890, page 4 © Illustrated London News Ltd/Mary Evans. https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0001578/18901206/011/0004

Horseracing picture – Lord Rosebery leading in Ladas [horse’s name] after the race for the Derby, Illustrated London News – Saturday 16 June 1894, page 1 © Illustrated London News Ltd/Mary Evans. https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0001578/18940616/003/0001

Picture of Gladstone – The Midlothian Election: Mr Gladstone addressing the crowd  from the balcony of Lord Rosebery’s house, Illustrated London News – Saturday 10 April 1880, page 1 © Illustrated London News Ltd/Mary Evans. https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0001578/18800410/002/0001

Picture of The Coronation of King Edward the Seventh and Queen Alexandra, Illustrated London News – Thursday 14 August 1902, page 13 © Illustrated London News Ltd/Mary Evans. https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0001578/19020814/023/0013

Picture of Rosebery as Prime Minister – The Earl of Rosebery Our New Prime Minister,  Penny Illustrated Paper,  Saturday 10 March 1894, Penny Illustrated Paper – Saturday 10 March 1894, page 8 https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0000693/18940310/057/0008

1870 Pokesdown map – https://maps.nls.uk/view/102343182

Quote about “parliamentarians worth their salt” – Butterfield, David, British Street Names, from The Spectator magazine 11 August 2018. Found at https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/british-street-names as of 03/04/2021

Newspaper article about road names – Go-Ahead Bournemouth. Beautiful Beyond Any Seaside Place. Bournemouth Daily Echo, Wednesday 22 August 1900, page 2. From https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0000638/19000822/038/0002 as of 03/04/2021

Rosebery, Harcourt and Morley cartoon courtesy of Morgan Library & Museum https://www.themorgan.org/drawings/item/309099

Quote about “park” – Young, J.A. (1997) Pokesdown Past 1750 to 1900. Bournemouth Local Studies Publications, No. 737. ISBN 1 873887 12 4. Page 33.

Picture of deer – https://pixabay.com/photos/landscape-forest-deer-nature-path-4226798/

Picture of common land – https://pixabay.com/photos/landscape-scrubland-beach-sea-wild-1844672/

All other maps, diagrams and photos are created by and property of Rosebery Park Baptist Church.


Page 1

  1. Young, J.A. (1997) Pokesdown Past 1750 to 1900. Bournemouth Local Studies Publications, No. 737. ISBN 1 873887 12 4. Page 20.
  2. Gannaway, Norman (2009) William Pickford – A Biography. Hampshire Football Association Limited. Using PDF version from https://www.hampshirefa.com/about/history as of 17/03/2021. Pages 2 and 3.
  3. Young, Pokesdown Past, page 26.
  4. Young, J.A. (1993) Boscombe the Victorian Heritage. Bournemouth Local Studies Publications, No. 724. ISBN 0 906287 99 5. Page 12.
  5. Mate, Charles Henry (1910) Bournemouth: 1810-1910, the history of a modern health and pleasure resort. Original publisher Mate & Sons Ltd. Using e-book version from Dalcassian Publishing Company purchased at https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Charles_Henry_Mate_Bournemouth_1810_1910_the_histo?id=hxnUDwAAQBAJ as of 13/03/2021. Page 157 (or page 198 on PDF version).
  6. Young, Boscombe the Victorian Heritage, page 48.
table showing Population figures Pokesdown and Boscombe 1861 to 1901

7. Young, Boscombe the Victorian Heritage, page 12.

8. Young, David S. (1957) The Story of Bournemouth. Robert Hale Limited. Plate 34, between pages 160 and 161. Young offers the explanation about this picture: “The Ragged Cat (Palmerston Arms), c.1860. Several variations of this picture are in existence all apparently copied from a common original. This reproduction is from an oil painting executed in 1895 by W. Stevens and now [as of 1957] in the possession of the Bournemouth Public Libraries.”

9. Young, Pokesdown Past, page 32.

10. Young, Boscombe the Victorian Heritage, page 6.


11. Map showing the building estates:

Young, J.A. (1993) Boscombe the Victorian Heritage.

1865 Boscombe Estate No. 1 – page 50

1866 -1868 Boscombe Spa Estate – page 52 and 9

1875 Enclosure Lot 228 – page 53 and 12

1876 The Freemantle Estate – page 54 and 14

1881 The Hengistbourne Estate  – page 55 and 19

1884 The Shelley Estate (first instalment) – page 56 and 20

1886 The Verno Estate – page 57 and 21

1887 Boscombe Estate No. 2 (the former Clinigan Trust Land) – page 58 and 25

1887 Boscombe Manor Estate – page 59 and 25

Late 1880s Palmerston Estate – page 21

1877 Shaftesbury Estate – page 22

1888-89 Shelley Estate (next instalments) – page 25


Young, Pokesdown Past 1750 to 1900.

1857 the first estate – page 32

1877 The Boscombe Park Estate. Expanded July 1890 and May 1903 – page 37 to 38

1887 The Rosebery Park Estate – page 34 to 36

1884 The Eastbourne Park Estate – page 36 to 37

1892 Clarence Park Estate – page 39 to 40

1892 Priory View Estate – page 40 to 41

1890-93 Stourfield Estate – page 51 to 52

1894 Stourwood Estate – page 53 to 54


Godfrey, Alan (1992) Boscombe & Pokesdown 1923 Old Ordnance Survey Maps. Hampshire Sheet 86.10, The Godfrey Edition. Published by Alan Godfrey. Reprinted by courtesy of the Trustees of the National Library of Scotland. ISBN 0 85054 479 3. Christchurch History Society have got it listed as license Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial.


12. Young, Pokesdown Past, page 33.

12a. Young, Pokesdown Past, page 45.

13. http://www.south-central-media.co.uk/capital/vic-intro/vic-intro.htm on Charles Henry Mate, under paragraph ‘Wm Mate & Sons [William Mate 1826-1907] Publishers & Booksellers’ as of 13/03/2021

14. Mate, Charles Henry (1910) Bournemouth: 1810-1910, the history of a modern health and pleasure resort. Original publisher Mate & Sons Ltd. Using e-book version from Dalcassian Publishing Company purchased at https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Charles_Henry_Mate_Bournemouth_1810_1910_the_histo?id=hxnUDwAAQBAJ as of 13/03/2021. Page 156 – 157 (or page 197 – 198 on PDF version).


15. Timeline (1):

1867 Pokesdown is a thriving village, Boscombe is a nearby hamlet – Young, Pokesdown Past. Page 20.

1871 Pokesdown population 511 – Young, Pokesdown Past. Page 26.

1874 Boscombe Baptist Church established July 1874, chapel built on corner of Palmerston and Gladstone Road, held its first service March 1875 – Young, Boscombe the Victorian Heritage, page 29-30.

1876 Freemantle Estate built – Young, Boscombe the Victorian Heritage, page 54 and 14.

1877 Boscombe, Pokesdown & Springbourne Infirmary opened – the new permanent home of The Dispensary, to assist poorer people obtain treatment and medicines, plus accomodation for twelve patients. This Infirmary was the nucleus of Boscombe Hospital. – Young, Boscombe the Victorian Heritage, page 15-16.

1881 Pokesdown population 1,231 – Young, Pokesdown Past. Page 77.

1886 Railway station opened at Pokesdown, but called “Boscombe Station” – Young, Pokesdown Past. Page 45: “Construction of the station was commenced early in 1886, and this was opened on 1 July 1886. It consisted of an ‘island’ platform situated between the two pairs of running rails, and was about 600 feet long. Access was from the centre of the road bridge, down a covered stairway of forty steps. The station was named Boscombe, and did not become Pokesdown until the opening of the new Boscombe Station in Ashley Road in 1897.”

1886 horse-drawn omnibus route extended to Pokesdown – Young, Pokesdown Past. Page 45: “Following the opening of the station. Mr H.F. Beamish commenced in October 1886 to run a ‘new and splendid Garden-seated Pair-Horsed Omnibus’ between the Station and the Square in Bournemouth. There were five buses each way on weekdays… it seated ten inside and ten outside passengers…”

1887 Rosebery Park Estate built – Young, Pokesdown Past. Page 24 to 36.

1887 Queen Victoria – Young, Pokesdown Past. Page 50.

1888 first electricity in Bournemouth – “Education”, Streets of Bournemouth series, page 48. https://www.streets-of-bournemouth.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Education.pdf as of 01/04/2021

1889 Freemantle Baptist Mission Chapel opened – Young, Boscombe the Victorian Heritage, page 31 (see no.19 and 20 below for more information)

1891 Pokesdown population 3,033 – Young, Pokesdown Past. Page 77.

1891 Rosebery Park Baptist Church formed – Jeans, Robert J (1991) Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Centenary 1891-1991. Christchurch History Society reference number CHS017431 and also at Pokesdown, Rosebery Park Baptist Church. Pages 5 and 6. Also Young, Pokesdown Past. Pages 60 and 61.

1892 Rosebery Park Baptist Chapel built – Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Pages 6 and 7. Also Young, Pokesdown Past. Pages 60 and 61. And Pokesdown. Building a New Mission Hall. Christchurch Times, Saturday 30 April 1892, page 5, from https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/BL/0002170/18920430/048/0005

1894 to 1895 Lord Rosebery is Prime Minister – https://www.gov.uk/government/history/past-prime-ministers/archibald-primrose-5th-earl-of-rosebery as of 01/04/2021

1895 to 1901 Pokesdown is an Urban District Council – Young, Pokesdown Past. Pages 80 and 81.

1897 Boscombe Station opens on Ashley Road. Original Boscombe Station renamed Pokesdown – Quick, Michael (September 2020) Railway Passenger Stations in Great Britain: A Chronology. Fifth edition. Version 5.02. Railway and Canal Historical Society. Using PDF version from https://rchs.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/Railway-Passenger-Stations-v5.02.pdf as of 01/04/2021 Page 345.

1898 Pokesdown Science, Art & Technical School built – Young, Pokesdown Past. Pages 71 and 72.

1898 Pokesdown population 4,927 – Young, Pokesdown Past. Page 66.


16. “The Freemantle Estate” was built there in 1876, and Young, Boscombe the Victorian Heritage, page 14, writes: “It may be noted that the name Freemantle was for the next thirty or more years used for the general neighbourhood”. How long was the name “Freemantle” in use? Young says that by 1917 the name of “Freemantle” for the surrounding district had dropped out of general use (Pokesdown Past, page 64-65), but the name “Freemantle” still appears on the 1923 Godfrey edition Boscombe & Pokesdown map.

17. From https://forebears.io/england/hampshire/bournemouth/freemantle as of 31/03/2021

18. Young, Boscombe the Victorian Heritage, page 29-30.

19. Young, Boscombe the Victorian Heritage, page 31: “A Baptist mission chapel was opened in Christchurch Road on 10th September 1889, having been built by Mr G. Mitchell in corrugated iron. It was situated between Somerset and Warwick Roads, where the present Rosebery Park Baptist Church now stands, and was intended to serve the rapidly increasing population of Freemantle, Rosebery Park and Boscombe Park.”

20. “Boscombe. New Baptist Chapel at Freemantle”, Bournemouth Guardian, 14/09/1889. From https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0002176/18890914/068/0005

21. Young, Boscombe the Victorian Heritage, page 23, says: “Building of Freemantle Mission Hall in Somerset Road was started in December 1884… opened on 8th April 1885, the Hall was extended two years later, and the opening service for the extension took place on 31st May 1887.” Then Young, Pokesdown Past, page 64-65 provides this information: The Mission Room in Somerset Place, Freemantle, was re-purposed as the Freemantle School in April 1897. In 1917 it was renamed Somerset Road C. of E. School, as by that date the name of Freemantle for the surrounding district had dropped out of general use. The school was closed in 1922.

22. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Pages 6 and 7. Also Young, Pokesdown Past. Pages 60 and 61. And Pokesdown. Building a New Mission Hall. Christchurch Times, Saturday 30 April 1892, page 5, from https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/BL/0002170/18920430/048/0005


Page 2

23. Background map: Godfrey, Alan (1992) Boscombe & Pokesdown 1923 Old Ordnance Survey Maps. Hampshire Sheet 86.10, The Godfrey Edition. Published by Alan Godfrey. Reprinted by courtesy of the Trustees of the National Library of Scotland. ISBN 0 85054 479 3. Christchurch History Society have got it listed as license Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial.

Information of positions of church and Rosebery Park Estate:

Freemantle – From https://forebears.io/england/hampshire/bournemouth/freemantle as of 31/03/2021.

Position of Freemantle Baptist Mission – Young, Boscombe the Victorian Heritage, page 31.

Start of Rosebery Park Baptist Church – meeting at Livingstone Road, then building the chapel – Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Pages 6 and 7. Also Young, Pokesdown Past. Pages 60 and 61. And Pokesdown. Building a New Mission Hall. Christchurch Times, Saturday 30 April 1892, page 5, from https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/BL/0002170/18920430/048/0005

Rosebery Park Estate – Young, Pokesdown Past, pages 34 to 36.


24. Young, Pokesdown Past, page 33.

25. Streets of Bournemouth: Bournemouth’s Buildings, pages 20, and 22 to 23. From https://www.streets-of-bournemouth.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Bournemouths.Buildings.pdf as of 03/04/2021

26. Butterfield, David, British Street Names, from The Spectator magazine 11 August 2018. Found at https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/british-street-names as of 03/04/2021

27. https://www.gov.uk/government/history/past-prime-ministers/archibald-primrose-5th-earl-of-rosebery as of 01/04/2021 and https://roseberyestates.co.uk/dalmeny-house/the-5th-earl

28. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Morley_(MP) and Young, Pokesdown Past, page 35.

29. Young, Pokesdown Past, page 35.

30. Go-Ahead Bournemouth. Beautiful Beyond Any Seaside Place. Bournemouth Daily Echo, Wednesday 22 August 1900, page 2. From https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0000638/19000822/038/0002 as of 03/04/2021


30a. Captions and credits for photographs exactly as given on the National Portrait Gallery website:

Archibald Philip Primrose, 5th Earl of Rosebery (used on page 2)

© National Portrait Gallery, London

by Unknown photographer
woodburytype on paper mount, published 1878
4 5/8 in. x 3 1/2 in. (116 mm x 89 mm) image size
Purchased with help from the Friends of the National Libraries and the Pilgrim Trust, 1966
NPG x12745

Samuel Morley

© National Portrait Gallery, London

by Elliott & Fry
albumen cabinet card, 1870s-mid 1880s
5 7/8 in. x 4 1/8 in. (148 mm x 106 mm) image size
Purchased, 1995
NPG x76207

Sir William Vernon Harcourt

© National Portrait Gallery, London

by Henry Joseph Whitlock
albumen carte-de-visite, 1860s
3 1/2 in. x 2 1/4 in. (89 mm x 58 mm) image size
Purchased, 1978
NPG Ax8560

Granville George Leveson-Gower, 2nd Earl Granville

© National Portrait Gallery, London

by London Stereoscopic & Photographic Company
albumen carte-de-visite, 1873
3 5/8 in. x 2 3/8 in. (92 mm x 59 mm) image size
Purchased, 1985
NPG x24405


31. Wills, E.G. (1980) Pokesdown and Neighbourhood 1895 to 1910: A Memoir. Bournemouth Local Studies Publications, No. 618. ISBN 0 906287 04 9. Fourth impression. Pages 3 to 5.

32. Wills, Pokesdown and Neighbourhood, page 8.


33. 1898 map showing Rosebery Park Estate and local landmarks from over the years:

The background map is a copy of the ‘Pokesdown in 1898’ map in the centre of the Wills, Pokesdown and Neighbourhood booklet.

Rosebery Park Estate boundary is from Young, Pokesdown Past, page 36.

Position of Dr Dickie’s house, ‘Windermere’ is shown on map of Rosebery Park Estate, Young, Pokesdown Past, page 36.

New Era Laundry – established date taken from a 1946 Palace Court Theatre brochure with a New Era Laundry advert saying “established for over 45 years”, Alwyn Ladell Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/alwyn_ladell/15194474603/in/album-72157649470945291/ and further information from hovering over photo on Grant Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/45065527@N08/7690249002/

Photo from Red House Museum Facebook https://www.facebook.com/Rhm1764/photos/photo-friday-occasionally-we-pop-over-the-river-to-bournemouth-and-this-week-a-v/1055846011255271/

Original station entrance – from Grant Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/bournemouth_grant/7690249002

and Crawley, Limelight on Pokesdown. Page10. http://www.royhodges.co.uk/Limelight%20on%20Pokesdown%201963.pdf as of 03/03/2021 – Bill Dodge worked as a Pokesdown porter for 33 years, starting in 1919 (page 10). He says the demolition of the old station began in June, 1929. It all took some time, and was not finished until 1931 (page 11).

Pokesdown Fire Station – Grant Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/bournemouth_grant/7758865066/in/photostream/

Astoria Cinema – http://primolux.co.uk/astoria_pokesdown.htm

The Bell Inn – Grant Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/bournemouth_grant/7758763588/in/photostream/

The original Rosebery Park Baptist Chapel – Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Pages 6 and 7. Also Young, Pokesdown Past. Pages 60 and 61. And Pokesdown. Building a New Mission Hall. Christchurch Times, Saturday 30 April 1892, page 5, from https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/BL/0002170/18920430/048/0005

I don’t know where the name “Lockyer Hall” comes from or when it started being used. My theories include: maybe after the chapel was extended in 1897 and 1925 it had a specific hall part that was called Lockyer Hall. Maybe the Deaf Club were hiring this to use for meetings before they bought the chapel building in 1952, and decided to keep using the address Lockyer Hall for the whole of the chapel? https://salixembroidery.co.uk/club/bournemouth-deaf-club/ says “The Bournemouth Deaf Club have been meeting at the Lockyer Hall since the 1940’s”. Alwyn Ladell on Flickr has a leaflet from the Deaf Club from the 1970s with the name Lockyer Hall on it: https://www.flickr.com/photos/alwyn_ladell/34837146071/in/album-72157624460965785/ . The NHS Service Directory is still giving Lockyer Hall as the address of the Bournemouth Deaf Club as of 22/03/2021 https://www.nhs.uk/services/service-directory/bournemouth-deaf-club/N10497214 . But Turning Point Church, who have been using the chapel for their Sunday services since 01/07/2018, use the address “27a Morley Road” and don’t call it Lockyer Hall.

I haven’t found any information on the origins of the name “Lockyer Hall”. Does the name Lockyer come from a local person or family? I found this family tree at https://www.ancestry.co.uk/family-tree/person/tree/20195295/person/192245028450/story but I have no evidence of any of these Lockyers being involved with the church, or NOT involved with the church.

The name “Rev. Lockyer” appears in some newspaper stories, 1890s-1910s, but these are in relation to the Congregational church.

A reference is made to “Widow Lockyer of Pokesdown Farm” being left an annuity on the death of the Countess of Strathmore and Kinghorne, Mary Eleanor Bowes, who dies at Stourfield House on 28th April 1800 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Bowes,_Countess_of_Strathmore_and_Kinghorne#:~:text=She%20also%20left%20an%20annuity%20for%20the%20widow%20Lockyer%20of%20Pokesdown%20Farm.

Or one theory I had was that it was named after a famous Victorian, in the manner of the surrounding roads. Perhaps the scientists, Sir Norman Lockyer? See https://www.nature.com/articles/137809a0 . This Lockyer did know the Morley after whom Morley Road is named, they moved in the same circles. But it would seem odd to name a part of a Baptist church after an Anglican. Unless the name was applied to the building in the style of the surrounding roads, but after the church was sold to the Deaf Club in 1952?

Or maybe the Deaf Club gave it the name Lockyer Hall after someone in their group, or after someone they admired?

If anyone has any information about the name Lockyer Hall for the old chapel in Morley Road, Pokesdown, please let us know!

Science, Art & Technical School – photo – Alwyn Ladell Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/alwyn_ladell/8110372753/

Tram/trolleybus Depot – photo by Ken Mantock http://pokesdowncommunityforum.org.uk/history/pokesdown-trolleybus-depot-steptoe-and-son/ and https://www.flickriver.com/photos/alwyn_ladell/49866336242/ plus information from Grant Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/bournemouth_grant/6511846713

Picture of Bournemouth Corporation tram from postcard Alwyn Ladell Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/alwyn_ladell/5559482578/in/album-72157626220719617/

Picture of steam train (random, not Bournemouth-specific) from https://www.cleanpng.com/png-rail-transport-train-steam-locomotive-train-steam-72305/

Picture of horse from https://www.freepngs.com/horse-pngs

Picture of cow from https://pnghut.com/png/XR8ktR853a/cow-background-dairy-cattle-milk-cowgoat-family-transparent-png


33a. List of sources for Pokesdown Heritage Buildings, tables 1 and 2:

1761 Farm Cottages – Young, Pokesdown Past, page 3 and Alwyn Ladell Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/alwyn_ladell/albums/72157624477971103/with/5623203566/

1766 Stourfield House – Young, Pokesdown Past, page 2 and Perkins, Ed, Remembering farm cottages, Daily Echo, 26 July 2011, https://www.bournemouthecho.co.uk/news/features/snapshotsofthepast/9160737.remembering-farm-cottages/

1857 Congregational Chapel/URC Church https://www.flickr.com/photos/alwyn_ladell/albums/72157675103350445/with/31316732122/

1860 first Stourwood House https://www.flickr.com/photos/alwyn_ladell/albums/72157632577594908/

1872 Cromwell Hall https://www.flickr.com/photos/alwyn_ladell/30327313255 and Young,Pokesdown Past pages 26 and 27

1873 Wentworth Lodge https://www.flickr.com/photos/bournemouth_grant_too/8373432247

1874 Wesleyan Methodist Church https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/0b07a74f-b507-4cd5-aeb2-2e8affdbd984 1996 still in use as place of worship says Young pic 6 Pok and If Yest

1892 The original Rosebery Park Baptist Chapel – Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Pages 6 and 7. Also Young, Pokesdown Past. Pages 60 and 61. And Pokesdown. Building a New Mission Hall. Christchurch Times, Saturday 30 April 1892, page 5, from https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/BL/0002170/18920430/048/0005

1895 Corpus Christi https://www.flickr.com/photos/alwyn_ladell/albums/72157624200467111/

1895 the second Stourwood House https://www.flickr.com/photos/alwyn_ladell/albums/72157632577594908/

1897 Primitive Methodist https://www.flickr.com/photos/alwyn_ladell/albums/72157631824432024

1897 Freemantle School Young, Pokesdown Past, pages 64 and 65

1898 Boscombe Park Hall Bournemouth Guardian – Saturday 15 January 1898 – “opening of the new” https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0002177/18980115/103/0004 and and picture 33, Young, Pokesdown and Iford Yesterday

1898 Technical Hall – 1994-2021 Help& Care https://www.helpandcare.org.uk/news-and-media/news/we-bid-farewell-to-the-pokesdown-centre/

1899 British School Young, Pokesdown Past, page 68 and https://re-format.co.uk/pokesdown-primary-school/

1900 New Era Laundry – established date taken from a 1946 Palace Court Theatre brochure with a New Era Laundry advert saying “established for over 45 years”, Alwyn Ladell Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/alwyn_ladell/15194474603/in/album-72157649470945291/ and further information from hovering over photo on Grant Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/45065527@N08/7690249002/

1902 Wesleyan Methodist Church https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/0b07a74f-b507-4cd5-aeb2-2e8affdbd984

1903 White Horse Inn , Young, Pokesdown Past, page 18 and Grant Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/bournemouth_grant/7776081082

1904 The Bell Inn – Grant Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/bournemouth_grant/7758763588/in/photostream/

1905 Tram/trolleybus Depot –information from Grant Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/bournemouth_grant/6511846713

1907 Salvation Army https://www.flickr.com/photos/alwyn_ladell/sets/72157644804263683/

1913 Pokesdown Fire Station – Grant Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/bournemouth_grant/7758865066/in/photostream/

1919 PalladiumCinema http://primolux.co.uk/palladium_southbourne.htm

1932 Astoria Cinema – http://primolux.co.uk/astoria_pokesdown.htm Plus New Super Cinema for Boscombe, Bournemouth Graphic, Friday 21 October 1932 https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/BL/0002174/19321021/073/0012


34. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Pages 6 and 8.

35. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Pages 8 and 9.

36. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Page 11.

37. Pokesdown. Rosebery Park Baptist Church. Bournemouth Guardian, Saturday 20th October 1906, page 6. From https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/BL/0002177/19061020/132/0006

38. Local Sales of Work. Rosebery Park Baptists. Bournemouth Guardian, Saturday 9th November 1912, page 5 from https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/BL/0002177/19121109/084/0005

39. Rosebery Park Baptists. Annual sale of work at Pokesdown. Bournemouth Guardian, Saturday 31 October 1914, page 6 from https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/BL/0002177/19141031/070/0006

40. Bournemouth Graphic, Friday 29th January 1915, page 5 from https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/BL/0002173/19150129/038/0005

41. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Page 13.

42. Bournemouth Graphic, Friday 25 August 2016, page 6 from https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/BL/0002173/19160825/059/0006 and Friday 18 January 1918, page 2 from https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/BL/0002173/19180118/009/0002


43. Edgington, M.A. (1985) Bournemouth and the First World War: The Evergreen Valley 1914 to 1919. Bournemouth Local Studies Publications, No. 675. ISBN O 906287 57 X. October 2013 PDF edition as available at http://www.blsp.jp137.com/ (Bournemouth Local Studies Publications website) as of 07/03/2021.

16,000 troops – page 7 booklet (page 14 of PDF)

Infantry and mounted men – page 4 booklet (page 11 of PDF)

Troops from New Zealand – page 51 booklet (page 58 of PDF)

Iford encampment – page 56 booklet (page 63 of PDF)

New YMCA hut – page 7 booklet (page 14 of PDF)

Bournemouth War Hospital Wood Work Depot – page 77 & 78 booklet (page 84 & 85 of PDF)

Empire Club for girls – page 14 booklet (page 21 of PDF)


44. The Rev. W.H. Perkins, M.A. Farewell Meeting at Pokesdown. Bournemouth Guardian, Saturday 5th October 1918, page 4 from https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/BL/0002177/19181005/043/0004

45. The Education of Pokesdown. A Story of 22 Years. Mr G. Payne – His Work and Ideals. Bournemouth Guardian, 2nd July 1921, page 7 from https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/BL/0002177/19210702/117/0007

45a. Editor Peter Gould. Bournemouth Corporation Transport: The Trams and Trolleybuses. The Local Transport History Library. 2021. Page 6 and 7. from http://www.lthlibrary.org.uk/library/PDF-195-1.pdf as of 12/04/2021

46. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Pages 12 and 13.

46a. Re. the Marriage Act 1836 information from
Browse > Legislation > Marriage Act, 1836 – HISTPOP.ORGhttp://www.histpop.org › Browse › Legislation

An Act for Marriages in England. [17 August 1836]. 6 & 7 Will. IVc.85 … to be solemnized in England after the said First Day of March according to the Rites of … Act made in the Seventh Year of the Reign of His Majesty King William the Fourth, …


Page 3

47. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Pages 14 to 17 inclusive.

48. Unemployment in Bournemouth, Bournemouth Graphic, Friday 12 December 1919, page 17. https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/BL/0002173/19191212/141/0017

49. More and More Work Provided at Bournemouth, Portsmouth Evening News, Monday 20 April 1925, page 3 https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/BL/0000290/19250420/055/0003

50. Build-up the the General Strike, University of Warwick, Library, Modern Records Centre https://warwick.ac.uk/services/library/mrc/archives_online/digital/gs/timeline/before as of 21/04/2021

51. Brain, Jessica, The Great Depression, Historic UK https://www.historic-uk.com/HistoryUK/HistoryofBritain/Great-Depression/ as of 21/04/2021

52. Bournemouth Unemployment, Western Gazette, Friday 28 February 1930, page 3 https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/BL/0000407/19300228/006/0003

53. Unemployment in Bournemouth Area, Western Gazette, Friday 15 May 1931, page 10 https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/BL/0000407/19310515/065/0010

54. Bournemouth’s People, Streets of Bournemouth, pages 15 and 16 https://www.streets-of-bournemouth.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Bournemouths.People.pdf as of 21/04/2021

55. Tourism & The Town, Streets of Bournemouth, page 11 https://www.streets-of-bournemouth.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Tourism.and_.Town_.pdf as of 21/04/2021

56. e.g. announcement “Bournemouth Belle” leaves Waterloo 10.30am weekdays and Sundays, The Sketch newspaper, Wednesday 9 September 1931, page 60 https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0001860/19310909/074/0060

56a. Crawley, Limelight on Pokesdown. Page10. http://www.royhodges.co.uk/Limelight%20on%20Pokesdown%201963.pdf as of 03/03/2021 – Bill Dodge worked as a Pokesdown porter for 33 years, starting in 1919 (page 10). He says the demolition of the old station began in June, 1929. It all took some time, and was not finished until 1931 (page 11). And Wills, Pokesdown and Neighbourhood 1895 to 1910, page 2.

56b. https://www.railforums.co.uk/threads/old-gated-station-lifts.43339/ and http://beno.uk/lift/aldouscampbell.html

57. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Pages 18 to 21 inclusive.


57a. Photos from National Portrait Gallery:

Dick Sheppard (on page 3)

© National Portrait Gallery, London

by Bassano Ltd
bromide print, 16 April 1935
Purchased, 1996
NPG x84741

Hon. Ernest Brown (on page 3)

© National Portrait Gallery, London

by Bassano Ltd
whole-plate film negative, 3 July 1935
Given by Bassano & Vandyk Studios, 1974
NPG x151638


58. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Pages 19.

58a. “I” being the author of this online History of Rosebery Park Baptist Church and Pokesdown, Michelle Fogg

59. “The Freemantle Estate” was built there in 1876, and Young, Boscombe the Victorian Heritage, page 14, writes: “It may be noted that the name Freemantle was for the next thirty or more years used for the general neighbourhood”. How long was the name “Freemantle” in use? Young says that by 1917 the name of “Freemantle” for the surrounding district had dropped out of general use (Pokesdown Past, page 64-65), but the name “Freemantle” still appears on the 1923 Godfrey edition Boscombe & Pokesdown map.

60. advert for Seaside and Country Quarters, Sheffield Daily Telegraph, Tuesday 21 February 1928, page 2 https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0000250/19280221/052/0002 Interestingly, it’s an ad to let rooms in Morley Road, which is in Pokesdown AND the original Rosebery Park Estate, and NOT, and never was, in Boscombe Park!! I think this is more evidence of the avoidance of the name “Pokesdown” phenomenon!

61. Young, Pokesdown Past, page 3.

62. Bournemouth Corporation Transport, The Trams and Trolleybuses, 1902 – 1969. Series Editor: Peter Gould. The Local Transport History Library 2021, pages 8 to 10 inclusive http://www.lthlibrary.org.uk/library/PDF-195-1.pdf as of 22/04/2021

63. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Pages 22 and 23 inclusive.

64. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Pages 24 and 25 inclusive.

65. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Pages 23 to 25 inclusive.

66. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Page 27.


67. Edgington, M.A. (1994) Bournemouth and the Second World War 1939 – 1945. Bournemouth Local Studies Publications, No. 728. ISBN 1-873887-03-5. June 2013 PDF edition as available at http://www.blsp.jp137.com/ (Bournemouth Local Studies Publications website) as of 07/03/2021.

Salvation Army recreational facilities – page 6 (page 13 of PDF version)

British Restaurant – page 49 (page 56 of PDF version)

Army Cadet Force – page 64 (page 71 of PDF version)

toys from scrap metal – page 82 (page 89 of PDF version)

bombing – page 29 (page 36 of PDF version)


68. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Page 29.

69. Roll of Honour website http://www.roll-of-honour.com/Dorset/BournemouthPokesdown.html as of 23/04/2021

69a. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Page 17.

70. War Memorials at St. James The Greater, Pokesdown https://stjameswarmemorials.wordpress.com/wwii-memorial/wwii-roll-of-honour/leonard-william-hector-addoo/ as of 23/04/2021

Page 4

71. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Page 27.

72. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Page 28.

73. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Page 30.

74. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Pages 30 and 36.

75. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Pages 31 to 34 inclusive.

76. See note 33 above for thoughts about the name “Lockyer Hall”.

77. See note 23 above, plus Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Pages 31 to 34 inclusive.


78. Timeline 2:

1901 Pokesdown population and Pokesdown made a part of Bournemouth- Mate, Charles Henry (1910) Bournemouth: 1810-1910, the history of a modern health and pleasure resort. Original publisher Mate & Sons Ltd. Using e-book version from Dalcassian Publishing Company purchased at https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Charles_Henry_Mate_Bournemouth_1810_1910_the_histo?id=hxnUDwAAQBAJ as of 13/03/2021. Page 157 (or page 198 on PDF version).

1902 tramway opens – Bournemouth Corporation Transport, The Trams and Trolleybuses, 1902 – 1969. Series Editor: Peter Gould. The Local Transport History Library 2021, page 7 http://www.lthlibrary.org.uk/library/PDF-195-1.pdf as of 22/04/2021

1905 tram depot – Grant Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/bournemouth_grant/6511846713

1913 Pokesdown Fire Station – A New Fire Station for Pokesdown, Bournemouth Graphic, Friday 17 October 1913, page 13 https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0002173/19131017/122/0013

1913 ornamental Fisherman’s Walk opened – New Fisherman’s Walk, Bournemouth Guardian, Saturday 31 May 1913, page 7 https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0002177/19130531/091/0007

c.1917/early 1920s name Freemantle – Young, Pokesdown Past, page 64 to 65, Young says that by 1917 the name of “Freemantle” for the surrounding district had dropped out of general use, but the name “Freemantle” still appears on the 1923 Godfrey edition Boscombe & Pokesdown map.

1926 RPBC 126 members – Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Page 14.

1931 Keswick Hall built – Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Page 31.

early 1930s name change suggested – Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Page 19.

1934-36 trolleybuses replace trams – Bournemouth Corporation Transport, The Trams and Trolleybuses, 1902 – 1969. Series Editor: Peter Gould. The Local Transport History Library 2021, pages 8 to 9 http://www.lthlibrary.org.uk/library/PDF-195-1.pdf as of 22/04/2021

1949 – RPBC 252 members- Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Page 30.

1951 RPBC moves into Keswick Hall – Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Pages 31 to 34 inclusive.

1953 RPBC 317 members – Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Page 36.


79. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Page 34.

80. White, Reginald E., Advance and Reunion, The Baptist Quarterly 13.8, October 1950, page 341 https://biblicalstudies.org.uk/pdf/bq/13-8_341.pdf as of 23/04/2021

80a. Oil painting of Ernest Payne from https://artuk.org/discover/artworks/dr-ernest-alexander-payne-19021980-tutor-at-regent-parks-college-19401951-general-secretary-of-the-baptist-union-223111 by W.J. Rowden. Photo credit: Regent’s Park College, University of Oxford.

81. Tourism and the Town, Streets of Bournemouth, page 15 https://www.streets-of-bournemouth.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Tourism.and_.Town_.pdf

82. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Page 35 to 37 inclusive.

83. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Page 40 to 42 inclusive.

Page 5

84. Crawley, Tony, Limelight on Pokesdown, Christchurch Herald, 1st March 1963. Page 9. Found online at http://www.royhodges.co.uk/Limelight%20on%20Pokesdown%201963.pdf as of 03/03/2021.

85. Crawley, Limelight on Pokesdown. Page 3. http://www.royhodges.co.uk/Limelight%20on%20Pokesdown%201963.pdf as of 03/03/2021.

86. Crawley, Limelight on Pokesdown. Page11. http://www.royhodges.co.uk/Limelight%20on%20Pokesdown%201963.pdf as of 03/03/2021.

Additional note – current news as of April 2021, Pokesdown Station does NOT have a working lift, and hasn’t had for many years, which is a source of disappointment and frustration. There has been an on-going campaign, but multiple delays in reaching a resolution. For example, see Echo article, Pokesdown train station still doesn’t have lifts, Daily Echo, 5 July 2019 https://www.bournemouthecho.co.uk/news/17751942.pokesdown-train-station-still-doesnt-lifts/

87. Crawley, Limelight on Pokesdown. Page10. http://www.royhodges.co.uk/Limelight%20on%20Pokesdown%201963.pdf as of 03/03/2021.

88. Crawley, Limelight on Pokesdown. Pages 11 and 12. http://www.royhodges.co.uk/Limelight%20on%20Pokesdown%201963.pdf as of 03/03/2021.

89. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Pages 44 and 45.

90. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Pages 47 to 49 inclusive.

91. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Pages 50 and 51.

92. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Page 52.

93. Chandy, Matthew, The Last Steam Passenger Service in Britain, Money Week, 11 August 2020. https://moneyweek.com/403807/11-august-1968-the-last-steam-passenger-train-in-britain as of 24/04/2021. “After World War II, the low price of domestic coal meant steam trains continued to operate in the UK for two decades.”

and Bardell, Peter Sidney, thesis: The Balancing of Steam Locomotives: A Dynamical Problem of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, December 1988, quoting Cox, E.S., (the Mechanical Engineer responsible for locomotive design on the nationalised British Railways) from Locomotive Panorama, Vol 2, pp.152-153: “But for [other countries including Britain] there was no practical reason, only an emotional one, why steam could not have been replaced in an orderly and economical manner as indeed has been the case in a minority of countries abroad. In its final form it was perfectly capable of continuing to perform its duties with a very acceptable standard of performance and reliability, until it could be replaced, area by area, by more economical successors which had been given time to develop into their natural strides.” Found at:

https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=&ved=2ahUKEwjxrJOJ2fnvAhUgg_0HHTJHAfsQFjAAegQIAxAD&url=https%3A%2F%2Fspiral.imperial.ac.uk%2Fbitstream%2F10044%2F1%2F47350%2F2%2FBardell-PS-1989-PhD-Thesis.pdf&usg=AOvVaw1sWLDeFOOlDG034ZiqVmEu as of 24/04/2021

94. https://www.railwaysarchive.co.uk/docsummary.php?docID=23 and click on 1955 on this timeline https://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/railways/

95. Hewitt, Sam, The Beginning of the End for Southern Steam, The Railway Magazine, 17th April 2017. https://www.railwaymagazine.co.uk/1949/the-beginning-of-the-end-for-southern-steam/ as of 24/04/2021

96. click on 1963 on this timeline https://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/railways/

97. Frampton, Will, New bid to re-open historic Boscombe Railway Station, Daily Echo, 22nd January 2018 https://www.bournemouthecho.co.uk/news/15887440.new-bid-re-open-historic-boscombe-railway-station/ as of 24/04/2021.

98. Transport, Streets of Bournemouth, page 13: “A feature of modern railways has been delays caused by ‘leaves on the line’. This is not such a new phenomenon. The very cold winter of 1962-63 hit the trolleybus network hard and all services were suspended just before the New Year. Early in 1963 the decision was made to replace the much-loved trolleys with conventional diesel buses. Passenger numbers were declining, fewer trolleys were being made, and trolleys were less adaptable to new road layouts. The end was in sight and the final scheduled services ran on 19th April 1969.” https://www.streets-of-bournemouth.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Transport.pdf as of 24/04/2021. Diesel motor buses had since 1906 been in use around Bournemouth in addition to trams and trolleybuses, but they weren’t the main form of public transport until after 1969 – see Bournemouth Corporation Transport: The Buses http://www.lthlibrary.org.uk/library/PDF-196-1.pdf

99. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Pages 51, 52, and 54.

100. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Pages 55 and 59.

101. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Page 60.

102. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Pages 61 to 62.

103. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Pages 31 to 34 inclusive.

104. Richardson, Dave, The package holiday revolution, first published on History Extra, July 2016 https://www.historyextra.com/period/victorian/the-package-holiday-revolution/ as of 24/04/2021

105. Rice, Alison, How times have changed: A social history of holidays, Family Holiday Association, https://www.familyholidayassociation.org.uk/blog/how-times-have-changed-a-social-history-of-holidays/ as of 24/04/2021

106. Holidays – the hard facts, Seaside History, https://www.seasidehistory.co.uk/seaside_statistics.html as of 24/04/2021

107. Farr, Martin, Decline Beside the Seaside: British Seaside Resorts and Declinism, uploaded 20 June 2019, https://www.researchgate.net/publication/321668373_Decline_beside_the_seaside_British_seaside_resorts_and_declinism and Doyle, Janey, Bournemouth, south coast chameleon, BBC News, 23 August 2006, http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/5257112.stm as of 24/04/2021

Warman, Melanie and Hunter, Katherine, New Labour means new resort, The [Bournemouth] Daily Echo, Thursday March 26, 1998. From M. Fogg private collection.

108. Boscombe Strategic Assessment, October 2011, page 8, https://www.bournemouth.gov.uk/communityliving/LivinginBournemouth/BoscombeRegeneration/BoscombeRegenDocs/BoscombeRegenStats/Boscombe-Strategic-Area-Assessment-1MB.pdf as of 24/04/2021

109. Checking by road names, so as not to be misled by people/businesses who identify their district as Southbourne or Boscombe East, even when technically they are in Pokesdown.

110. Homes for Boscombe Strategy, 2017-20, figure 7, p 14 https://www.bournemouth.gov.uk/communityliving/LivinginBournemouth/BoscombeRegeneration/BoscombeRegenDocs/BoscombeRegenStats/homes-for-boscombe-strategy-17-20.pdf as of 24/04/2021

111. Crawley, Limelight on Pokesdown. Pages 11 and 12. http://www.royhodges.co.uk/Limelight%20on%20Pokesdown%201963.pdf as of 03/03/2021.

112. GALLERY: Castlepoint before it was Castlepoint – do you remember the Hampshire Centre?, Daily Echo, 18th March 2015 https://www.bournemouthecho.co.uk/news/11861724.gallery-castlepoint-before-it-was-castlepoint-do-you-remember-the-hampshire-centre/ as of 24/04/2021

Page 6

113. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Pages 65 and 66 inclusive.

114. The Baptist Quarterly, page 207 https://biblicalstudies.org.uk/pdf/bq/35-4_168.pdf as of 24/04/2021

115. RPBC Good News magazine from November 1991, page 3, courtesy of Alwyn Ladell Flickr at https://www.flickr.com/photos/alwyn_ladell/31668072353/in/album-72157649292762173/ as of 24/04/2021

115a. Slade, Darren, How Boscombe’s Christchurch Road has changed over the decades, Daily Echo, 1 April 2015, https://www.bournemouthecho.co.uk/news/12783978.gallery-how-boscombes-christchurch-road-has-changed-over-the-decades/ as of 28/04/2021

115b. Interesting Facts, Castlepoint Shopping, posted 28/05/2018, https://www.castlepointshopping.com/news-events/interesting-facts as of 28/04/2021


115c. Photos and dates for buildings demolished in the 1990s:

Colour photo incl. New Era Laundry from Red House Museum and Gardens Facebook https://www.facebook.com/Rhm1764/photos/photo-friday-occasionally-we-pop-over-the-river-to-bournemouth-and-this-week-a-v/1055846011255271/

Black and white photo incl. New Era Laundry from Pinterest https://www.pinterest.co.uk/pin/498421883746250871/

New Era Laundry being demolished from Grant Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/bournemouth_grant_too/9464094071/

Flats on same site, photo taken for RPBC, 31/05/2021

Tram Depot from Alwyn Ladell Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/alwyn_ladell/49866336377 November, 1993.Original photograph © Kenneth Mantock, scanned and curated for Bournemouth Civic Society.

Tram Depot demolished, photo by Ken Mantock, from http://pokesdowncommunityforum.org.uk/history/pokesdown-trolleybus-depot-steptoe-and-son/

Flats on same site, photo taken for RPBC, 31/05/2021

115d. Photos and dates for buildings demolished in the 1990s – early 2000s:

Astoria as bingo and being demolished from http://primolux.co.uk/astoria_pokesdown.htm

Flats on same site, photo taken for RPBC, 31/05/2021

White horse Inn from Grant Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/bournemouth_grant/7776081082 Image courtesy of John Yeoman.

White horse Inn demolition 2003 from Grant Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/bournemouth_grant/7776063690

Flats on same site, photo taken for RPBC, 31/05/2021


115e. We bid farewell to the Pokesdown Centre, Help & Care, https://www.helpandcare.org.uk/news-and-media/news/we-bid-farewell-to-the-pokesdown-centre/ as of 02/06/2021

“In 1985 Help & Care was formed as a short term project to develop community support in Bournemouth.

Help & Care moved to the former school in 1994. Despite its grandeur from the outside, the building was hugely damaged in the inside, and within a year the roof collapsed. 

In 1996 Help and Care purchased the building with the support from the National Lottery and Charitable Trusts. Extensive repairs and adaptation was undertaken to save the building.

In 1998 the newly renovated Help & Care building was opened by Paul Boateng, Under Secretary of State for Health.

Help & Care undertook extensive further repairs in 2013 this restored much of the original stonework 

When Help & Care moved into the Pokesdown Centre in 1994 it employed 11 staff.  As they secure the sale in April 2021 the organisation now employs 150 staff and is supporting people and communities across Southern England.

The Pokesdown Centre has been a home that has overseen the organisations growth and development.  At many times in the last 27 years it has been the asset and base that has seen the organisation weather turbulent times.  Help & Care is proud to be part of the Pokesdown community and many of our staff based there live locally.  Help & Care hope that they have been good custodians of this magnificent building and that it will continue to be a landmark for many years to come.

Help & Care goes from strength to strength and the sale of the Pokesdown Centre, whilst emotional, is just another stage in the journey so we can focus on doing more for people and communities and continue to be an integral part of wherever local is. “

and https://www.helpandcare.org.uk/about-us/our-history/the-nineties/ as of 02/06/2021

1993: This year we also discovered the former Pokesdown Science, Art and Technical school in Christchurch Road, in Bournemouth; a huge, red brick, Victorian building which sadly was boarded up due to significant damages. The possibility of moving was first discussed.

1994: Help & Care moved into the dilapidated Pokesdown Centre. Despite its grandeur from the outside, the building was hugely damaged in the inside, and within a year the roof collapsed.

1995: This year we also bought and started refurbishing the Pokesdown Centre, thanks to being awarded with £158,000 grant from the National Lottery Charities Board Trusts. We also raised £297 from a Charity Football Match between Help & Care Staff and AFC Bournemouth V 2CR (local radio station).

1998:  the newly renovated Help & Care building was opened by Paul Boateng, Under Secretary of State for Health.


116. This information was provided by Miss Enid Abraham (long term church member, and Church Secretary from 1976 to 1986) to Jo Harmsworth (Church Secretary as of April 2021).

117. This information was provided by Jo Harmsworth (Church Secretary as of April 2021).

117a. Pokesdown Station Mural Project – from Pokesdown Mural Project Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/Pokesdown-Mural-Project-108886592529111/ and Top national award for Pokesdown station mural, Daily Echo, 4th October 2011 https://www.bournemouthecho.co.uk/news/9286012.top-national-award-for-pokesdown-station-mural/

118. Information from Alwyn Ladell Flickr album on Rosebery Park Baptist Church, which he got from the previous incarnation of the RPBC website https://www.flickr.com/photos/alwyn_ladell/albums/72157649292762173/

119. This information was provided by Jo Harmsworth (Church Secretary as of April 2021).

Page 7

120. Bailey, Stephen, Grant to give Pokesdown back its identity, Daily Echo, 1st February 2012 https://www.bournemouthecho.co.uk/news/9505204.grant-to-give-pokesdown-back-its-identity/ as of 24/04/2021

120a. Pokesdown traders join forces with residents, Daily Echo, 16th April 2012 https://www.bournemouthecho.co.uk/news/9650762.pokesdown-traders-join-forces-with-residents/

121. Milla and Stuart’s blog, Pokesdown, Beyond Beach Huts, https://beyondbeachhuts.wordpress.com/pokesdown/ and Pokesdown Vintage Quarter, 3 July 2015, https://beyondbeachhuts.wordpress.com/2015/07/03/pokesdown-vintage-quarter/

122. Frampton, Will, New vintage and hand made goods shop opens in Pokesdown, Daily Echo, 7th May 2013 https://www.bournemouthecho.co.uk/news/10403834.new-vintage-and-hand-made-goods-shop-opens-in-pokesdown/

122a. Frampton, Will, Campaigners calling for lifts to be installed at Pokesdown Railway Station, Daily Echo, 28th February 2014 https://www.bournemouthecho.co.uk/news/11044286.campaigners-calling-for-lifts-to-be-installed-at-pokesdown-railway-station/ and BBC News, Pokesdown station access for disabled delayed until 2020, 9 July 2019 https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-dorset-48919948 as of 17/05/2021 and petition https://www.change.org/p/south-west-trains-network-rail-make-pokesdown-station-accessible

123. BCP Council, Deprivation across the BCP area, Indices of Multiple Deprivation – 2019 Update, September 2019, Insight Briefing Paper https://www.earlyhelppartnership.org.uk/News-and-Updates/news-docs/BCP-Insight-IMD-2019.pdf as of 24/04/2021

124. Voting statistics from Boscombe & Pokesdown Neighbourhood Plan http://www.boscombepokesdown.org.uk/ as of 03/06/2021:

“The results have come through for the referendum and it’s a resounding YES! Thank you to all who started the plan and to those that continued to support, cajole and encourage, giving freely of their own time and energy. There’s always more to do, but this is a great outcome for this step of the journey!

In case you wanted to know the numbers:
Electorate: 15696
Ballot Papers Verified: 2159
TURNOUT: 13.74%
YES – 2006 (93.48%)
NO – 140 (6.52%)

Although the turnout was low, it’s a good result for this area. Thanks for voting!”

and Boscombe & Pokesdown Neighbourhood Plan, 2019, page 5 and page 84 http://www.boscombepokesdown.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/190812_BaPNPv15.pdf

124a. Boscombe & Pokesdown Neighbourhood Plan, APPENDIX A: REGULATION 14 PLANNING POLICIES WE CONSULTED ON, pages 6 and 7 http://www.boscombepokesdown.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/180412_BAP_Consult_Appendices.pdf as of 09/06/2021

124b. Dove Mural – Pokesdown Station, 18/08/2020, Krishna Malla from http://www.findglocal.com/GB/Bournemouth/192361097454528/Technicolour-Moon as of 09/06/2021

124c. Reader, Jane, New dove mural unveiled at Pokesdown station, Daily Echo, 20th August 2020 https://www.bournemouthecho.co.uk/news/18663344.new-dove-mural-unveiled-pokesdown-station/ as of 09/06/2021

Page – Pokesdown: the name.

124d. July 2021 update – from ‘Cecil Papers: 1586’, in Calendar of the Cecil Papers in Hatfield House: Volume 13, Addenda, ed. E Salisbury (London, 1915), pp. 292-329. British History Online http://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-cecil-papers/vol13/pp292-329 [accessed 27 July 2021]. Use ‘Keyword highlight’ function to find reference to Pokesdown.

The Hatfield House website explains: “The Cecil Papers are the core collection in Hatfield House Archives. They consist of the papers of William Cecil (1521-98) Lord Burghley and his son Robert Cecil (1563-1612) First Earl of Salisbury. There are also a few papers of William Cecil (1591-1668) Second Earl of Salisbury. The Cecil Papers comprise about 30,000 documents. They include grants from the Crown, legal documents, state papers, treaties, correspondence and political memoranda. There are some papers of the Earl of Essex and letters from Sir Walter Ralegh and Queen Elizabeth I.

The Cecil Papers have been comprehensively catalogued and described in the Calendar of the Salisbury (Cecil) Manuscripts which was published in 24 volumes by the Historical Manuscripts Commission between 1883 and 1976. It is advisable to look at the calendar before making any inquiry about the Cecil Papers. Sets are available at The National Archives, the British Library and in various academic and reference libraries.” https://www.hatfield-house.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Finding_Aids.pdf as of 27/07/2021

125. Young, Pokesdown Past, pages 2 and 3. Also:

Year: 1586 and 1594 Evidence: Lay Subsidy Roll for Westover, includes John Mantle of Pokesdown What is it?: a list of taxes the “common” people paid in “Westover”, which was the name for roughly the same land as the modern-day borough of Bournemouth but minus Kinson.

Year: 1665 Evidence: Health Tax List includes John, Henry and William Mantle of Pokesdown.

And explanation of Lay Subsidy Roll from GenGuide https://www.genguide.co.uk/source/lay-subsidy-rolls-tax-parish-records/

When taken into account with the evidence of –

Year: 1660 Evidence: Henry Mantle of Pokesdown elected a church warden of Christchurch Priory.

Year: 1662-63 Evidence: churchwarden accounts record the receipt of one shilling from Henry Mantle of Pokesdown in payment “for a place for his wife where his mother did sit”.

it is extrapolated that the Mantle family had been in the area since the earlier date of 1586. But I prefer the definite proof of seeing “of Pokesdown” in writing in 1600!

………….

Young, Pokesdown Past, page 2: “In his book ‘Place names in Dorset’ A. Miller suggests that the name is of 13th century origin.

…………….

126. Young, David S. (1957) The Story of Bournemouth. Page 186.

127. June 2021 – Re. Mary Bowes, Countess of Strathmore and Kinghorne, I don’t have access to the original sources, so I am having to trust the compiler of this Wikipedia article, but I find this note about the widow of Pokesdown Farm interesting, and therefore worth mentioning. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Bowes,_Countess_of_Strathmore_and_Kinghorne#:~:text=She%20also%20left%20an%20annuity%20for%20the%20widow%20Lockyer%20of%20Pokesdown%20Farm.

The Wikipedia article states, under ‘Retirement and death’ that “Details of Mary’s life at Stourfield House have been preserved in the transcribed memoirs of an elderly Pokesdown resident.” In Young’s Pokesdown Past, page 5, he writes: “Farmer Richard Dale was persuaded by Mrs. Popham, then resident at Stourfield House, to write his memoirs of Stourfield. He had been born towards the end of the 18th century, and for a number of years had lived at Pokesdown Farm….Richard Dale has left a detailed survey of the various tenants of Stourfield Hose from the time of its purchase by Sir George Tapps until it was sold in 1844…”

Update – July 2021 – I now have a copy of: Dale, Richard (original 1876, this edition 1981) Stourfield Memories (aka Reminiscences of Stourfield in the 19th Century) Bournemouth Local Studies Publications, No. 613.
ISBN 0 9505027 8 2. Page 5 confirms: “When she [Mary Bowes] left Stourfield she left a small annuity for Widow Lockyer, who lived at one end of the old farm-house at Pokesdown, then rented by my father, who used to get the money remitted annually.”

128. Date of Stourfield House – Young, Pokesdown Past, pages 3 and 4. Stourfield House isn’t described as being “at Pokesdown” or “in Pokesdown”. Rather the 1789 advert for the sale of the property describes the house as “ten miles from Wimborne, eight from Poole, twelve from Ringwood and fourteen from Lymington, the notice continued, “It is in a respectable and polite neighbourhood and in the vicinity of stag, fox and hare hounds and within four miles of a bathing machine and fine sands”. This latter would no doubt refer to sea bathing at Mudeford which at that date was a seaside resort.”

Date of Pokesdown Farm? Grant Flickr says “Most of the farms, smallholdings and associated cottages came and went without being recorded on maps although Pokesdown Farm is one of the few exceptions, its origins are a little lost in the mists of time, some claim to have traced it back to 1580 although it was certainly there in the 1660s.” https://www.flickr.com/photos/bournemouth_grant/7815247318

and Perkins. Ed, Remembering the farm cottages, Daily Echo, 26th July 2011, “Bournemouth Libraries senior heritage librarian Peter Kazmierczak believes they were part of a tiny community surrounding Pokesdown Farm, which predated Stourfield House which was built in 1766.” https://www.bournemouthecho.co.uk/news/features/snapshotsofthepast/9160737.remembering-farm-cottages/

1870 Pokesdown map from https://maps.nls.uk/view/102343182

129. Peaksdown? – a high point in the downs – Young, Pokesdown Past, page 2. “Herbert Druitt suggested that it might be a corruption of Peaksdown, a high point in the downs; the suffix ‘down’ is certainly related to Littledown, Moordown (previously spelled Moredown) and Wallisdown.

also Pokesdown, Christchurch Times, Saturday 12 September 1896, page 5 https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0002170/18960912/079/0005

130. From a surname? – Young, Pokesdown Past, page 2. “Again, it may have been a personal name ‘Pocs’ down’, similar to Poxwell, near Weymouth, which is pronounced Pokeswell.”

Young, David S. (1957) The Story of Bournemouth. Page 186. “It would seem probable that the first element in ‘Pokesdown’ is a personal name but whether of Old English or later origin is uncertain.”

Old Hampshire Gazetteer:

Coates 1989
POKESDOWN, suburb of Bournemouth, now in Dorset
Middle English ‘goblin’s hill’; unless the Middle English derivative of Old English ‘puca’ is here a surname. It survives in this capacity as ‘Pook’. http://www.oldhampshiremapped.org.uk/hantsgaz/hantsgaz/hgdndx_f.htm

130a. Calkin, J. Bernard, Prehistoric Pokesdown, Proceedings of the Bournemouth Natural Science Society, Vol. XL, Session 1949-50, page 83. The whole volume is available at https://ia802505.us.archive.org/14/items/proceedingsofbou4119bour/proceedingsofbou4119bour.pdf as of 27/07/2021

131. Haycock/heaps of hay? – Young, David S. (1957) The Story of Bournemouth. Page 186. “It could be a corruption of Pooks Down but if so it is more likely that the distinguishing adjective was the dialect word meaning ‘haycock’ that that it conveyed a genuine survival of belief in the occupation of the downs by fairies…”

Old Hampshire Gazetteer:

Coates 1989

Young (1957: 186) wonders whether the dialect word for ‘haycock’ (cf Cope under ‘pook, puck’) is involved; but the 13th century with a medial ‘-s-‘ speaks against this. http://www.oldhampshiremapped.org.uk/hantsgaz/hantsgaz/hgdndx_f.htm

Collins English Dictionary. Copyright © HarperCollins Publishers

Definition of ’pook’ – NOUN – Southwest England dialect – A haycock

Haycock in British English – NOUN – a small cone-shaped pile of hay left in the field until dry enough to carry to the rick or barn https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/pook

131a. Pig’s Down?Pokesdown, Bournemouth Graphic, Thursday 14 August 1902, page 9 https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0002173/19020814/033/0010

and “Pig’s Down” or “Puck’s Down”?, Bournemouth Guardian, Saturday 20 October 1906, page 5 https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0002177/19061020/119/0005

and Place Names, Christchurch Times, Saturday 29 August 1896, page 4. https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0002170/18960829/079/0004

131b. Pox-down? from The Hospice of St Mary Magdalen now known as Forget-Me-Not Cottage, Holdenhurst Village history website, http://www.1kpl.com/holdenhurst/hospice.htm and a related reply to a post on Facebook page Bournemouth History, dated 25 April 2020, stating “Pokesdown used to be known as POCSDOWN or POXDOWN and a lot of its inhabitants died from a Pocs and were buried on a plot of land within unmarked graves in Holdenhurst Village just behind a newly named Stert Lane not to be confused with Sturt Lane in Poole. Many folks would cross on the Ferry at Blackwater in Christchurch and walk along the long Hurn Road ’til it became unmade and still is at Church Lane and would visit the original Saxon Church, three walls of which still remain and form part of a semi detached next to my own circa 1660 property Bramble Cottage. A part of the Saxon Churches window was unearthed when its garage was built thirty five years ago and the piece added to the front at the top! The original website i made over twenty years ago is sill very interesting but very basic it has many old photographs – so please enjoy www.holdenhurstvillage.co.uk”

132. Pixies/fairies? – Young, Pokesdown Past, page 2. “It [the name of Pokesdown] is related by some people to a connection with Puck and fairies.”

Young, David S. (1957) The Story of Bournemouth. Page 186. “It could be a corruption of Pooks Down but if so it is more likely that the distinguishing adjective was the dialect word meaning ‘haycock’ that that it conveyed a genuine survival of belief in the occupation of the downs by fairies, however attractive so fanciful a solution might appear.”

Old Hampshire Gazetteer:

Coates 1989
POKESDOWN, suburb of Bournemouth, now in Dorset
Middle English ‘goblin’s hill’; unless the Middle English derivative of Old English ‘puca’ is here a surname. It survives in this capacity as ‘Pook’. Young (1957: 186) wonders whether the dialect word for ‘haycock’ (cf Cope under ‘pook, puck’) is involved; but the 13th century with a medial ‘-s-‘ speaks against this. http://www.oldhampshiremapped.org.uk/hantsgaz/hantsgaz/hgdndx_f.htm

Crawley, Tony, Limelight on Pokesdown, page 3: “Mr, Young then goes on to suggest that Pokesdown could be a corruption of Pooks Down. Now this is the most popular theory. Many people are sure that Pooks (or Puck’s) Down it was—referring to the fairies living, playing and dancing merrily on the downs in question. Really, this is just another of Puck’s Tales! Mr. Young, for instance, prefers the view that the very adjective ”Pooks” was in fact nothing to do with fairies, or even goblins of any kind—but was the dialect word of that day and age for ”hay cock.”” http://www.royhodges.co.uk/Limelight%20on%20Pokesdown%201963.pdf

133. The Púca (Pooka) In Irish Folklore, Your Irish Culture, https://www.yourirish.com/folklore/irish-pookas as of 26/04/2021

134. https://www.britannica.com/topic/puck-fairy

134a. For further explanations about being “pixie led” scroll half way down this page: https://britishfairies.wordpress.com/tag/pixie-led/

134b. from wiki page Will-o’-the-Wisp https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Will-o%27-the-wisp Technically, the gassy chemical glow is explained thus –  “While urban legends, folklore and superstition typically attribute wills-o’-the-wisp to ghosts, fairies or elemental spirits, modern science explains them as natural phenomena such as bioluminescence or chemiluminescence, caused by the oxidation of phosphine (PH3), diphosphane (P2H4) and methane (CH4) produced by organic decay.”

134c. Lindell, Jefferey, The Ignis Erraticus, Indiana University Folklore Institute https://web.archive.org/web/20090725120148/http:/jeff.lindell.home.comcast.net/~jeff.lindell/Ignis%20Erraticus.html as of 30/05/2021

134d. Dale, Richard, Stourfield Memories, (aka Reminiscences of Stourfield in the 19th Century) Bournemouth Local Studies Publications, this edition, 1981, ISBN 0 95055027 8 2, page 4 (with thanks to Michael Stead, Heritage Team, BCP Libraries, for putting me on to this information)

134e. Aubrey, John, (the name of the journalist commenting on this author’s work is not given, other than the initials J.B.) The Natural History of Wiltshire 1656 and 1691, Wilts & Gloucestershire Standard, Tuesday 26 October 1847, page 4 https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0001955/18471026/032/0004

134f. Ashley, Leonard R.N., The Complete Book of Devils and Demons, online extract Minor Supernatural Creatures of Britain from Google Books https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=sIgkAgAAQBAJ&pg=PT265&lpg=PT265&dq=kit+candlesticks+pixies&source=bl&ots=yzLxW2TZVu&sig=ACfU3U2-4UZBbpqf-ZX5JDwtEJDqz5_o5A&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjaprDamfDwAhVD4eAKHbjkCjkQ6AEwD3oECBMQAw#v=onepage&q=kit%20candlesticks%20pixies&f=false

134g. Calkin, J. Bernard, Prehistoric Pokesdown, Proceedings of the Bournemouth Natural Science Society, Vol. XL, Session 1949-50, page 83. The whole volume is available at https://ia802505.us.archive.org/14/items/proceedingsofbou4119bour/proceedingsofbou4119bour.pdf as of 27/07/2021

I have also read an article, not specifically about the Pokesdown name, but supporting this theory Calkin mentions: Folk Memory – Belief in Fairies, Bournemouth Guardian, Saturday 29 June 1912, page 10 https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/BL/0002177/19120629/165/0010 as of 27/07/2021

135. Puck of Pook’s Hill is available to read as an ebook at https://www.gutenberg.org/files/26027/26027-h/26027-h.html as of 26/04/2021

136. Young, David S. (1957) The Story of Bournemouth. Page 186.

137. Clark, Cumberland, Pokesdown, The Bournemouth Song Book, third edition 1939, published by Wilding & Son Ltd, pages 95 and 96 https://www.flickr.com/photos/alwyn_ladell/8568889819/in/album-72157633023590323/

137a. Place Names, Christchurch Times, Saturday 29 August 1896, page 4. https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0002170/18960829/079/0004

137b. Young, J.A., Pokesdown and Iford Yesterday, Bournemouth Local Studies Publications, No. 700, 1996. Note with picture no.35.

137b2. Young. J.A., A History of Pokesdown: Part 2 The Town, Bournemouth Local Studies Publications, No. 693, 1988, ISBN 0 906287 72 3, page 10

137c. Bournemouth Daily Echo, Saturday 10 January 1903, page 3 https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0000638/19030110/067/0003

138. Quick, Michael, Railway Passenger Stations in Great Britain, fifth edition, Sept 2020, https://rchs.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/Railway-Passenger-Stations-v5.02.pdf as of 26/04/2021

138a. Baldwin, Bridget, An Historical Guide: St James the Greater, Pokesdown, 1993, printed by Sabey Printing, Christchurch, pages 22 and 23. (Added to page Pokesdown: the name, 01/09/2021)

139. Crawley, Tony, Limelight on Pokesdown, page 1 http://www.royhodges.co.uk/Limelight%20on%20Pokesdown%201963.pdf as of 26/04/2021

140. https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/goblin#:~:text=%3A%20an%20ugly%20or%20grotesque%20sprite,and%20sometimes%20evil%20and%20malicious

141. information taken from Alwyn Ladell Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/alwyn_ladell/albums/72157631254387376/with/7865014776/

142. Sunday Trams, Bournemouth Daily Echo, Saturday 21 October 1905, page 3 https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/BL/0000638/19051021/061/0003?

143. Oldridge, Darren, Fairies and the Devil in early modern England, 29 March 2016, The Seventeenth Century, Volume 31, Issue 1 https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0268117X.2016.1147977 as of 27/04/2021

143a. Cresswell, Lionel, Witchcraft in Washburndale, Shipley Times and Express, Friday 21 January 1921, page 7 https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0001711/19210121/112/0007

144. Windling, Terry, Queen Victoria’s Book of Spells, Introduction: Fantasy, Magic, & Fairyland in 19th Century England, Anthologies, 2013 https://www.terriwindling.com/anthologies/fantasy-magic-fairyland-in-19th-century-england.html as of 27/04/2021

144a. Queen Victoria’s Fairy (yacht), from Fairies World http://www.fairiesworld.com/weblog/2009/03/23/queen-victorias-fairy/

144b. Brown, Eric C., The Influence of Queen Victoria on England’s Literary Fairy Tale, page 31, extract viewed at https://www.jstor.org/stable/41388521?seq=1 as of 31/05/2021

144c. ‘Pig’s Down’ or ‘Puck’s Down’?, Bournemouth Guardian, Saturday 20 October 1906 page 5 https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0002177/19061020/119/0005

144d. Credits for images used in picture A Pixie/fairy/goblin-free picture of the origins of the name “Pokesdown”!   

Farmer peasant https://pixabay.com/vectors/peasant-farmer-agricultural-man-5138145/

Pig https://pixabay.com/illustrations/pig-pork-swine-piglet-hog-animal-5940345/

Haycock  https://pixabay.com/vectors/haycock-haystack-mow-rick-yellow-306744/

Downs/low hills  https://pixabay.com/vectors/landscape-spring-summer-fields-152502/



145. newspaper articles/letters giving suggestions for alternate names for “Pokesdown”:

Maybourne; Re-naming Pokesdown, Bournemouth Guardian, Saturday 5 November 1898, page 3 https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0002177/18981105/086/0003

Brooksdown; Richmond-on-Sea – Re-naming Pokesdown, Bournemouth Guardian, Saturday 8 October 1898, page 3 https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0002177/18981008/097/0003

Bournemouth East – Bournemouth Guardian, Saturday 13 April 1901, page 7 https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0002177/19010413/235/0007

and (re. Station name) Ancient Name Lost, Daily Mirror, Wednesday 5 February 1930, page 2

Pinecliff; Boscombe Park; Pinehurst-on-Sea; Stourcliff; Avonhurst; Havenbourne; Portman Park – Pokesdown, Christchurch Times, Saturday 12 September 1896, page 5 https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0002170/18960912/079/0005

Pinehurst-on-Sea – Place Names, Christchurch Times, Saturday 29 August 1896, page 4. https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0002170/18960829/079/0004

Southbourne – Pokesdown Station to be Re-named, Bournemouth Daily Echo, Saturday 9 August 1902, page 3 https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0002173/19020918/044/0008 and Pokesdown, Bournemouth Graphic, Thursday 14 August 1902, page 9 https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0002173/19020814/033/0010

Boscombe Park; Boscombe East; Pinehurst-on-Sea – The New Name, Christchurch Times, Saturday 5 September 1896, page 5 https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0002170/18960905/064/0005 and

Boscombe Park – Jumpers Road, Christchurch Times, Saturday 23 July 1910, page 5 https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0002170/19100723/085/0005

Stourbourne or Portman Cliff – The Change of Name, Christchurch Times, 01 August 1896, page 5 https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0002170/18960801/080/0005

West Southbourne – Pokesdown Residents Not Proud of Name, Portsmouth Evening News, Thursday 9 October 1924, page 7 https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0000290/19241009/164/0007


146. Bailey, Stephen, Grant to give Pokesdown back its identity, Daily Echo, 1 February 2012, https://www.bournemouthecho.co.uk/news/9505204.grant-to-give-pokesdown-back-its-identity/

Page – Pokesdown: its boundaries

147. Young, Pokesdown Past, page 58.

148. Young, Pokesdown Past, page 3. Map from National Library of Scotland https://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/#zoom=16&lat=50.72462&lon=-1.82877&layers=175&b=1

149. The New Name, Christchurch Times, Saturday 5 September 1896, page 5 https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0002170/18960905/064/0005

150. Bell, Mrs Arthur (1916) From Harbour to Harbour: The Story of Christchurch, Bournemouth and Poole from the Earliest Times to the Present Day. London G. Bell and Sons Ltd. Page 202. Found at https://www.forgottenbooks.com/en/books/FromHarbourtoHarbour_10633872 as of 14/03/2021

150a. The Submerged Bournemouth, Bournemouth Guardian, Saturday 01 September 1906, page 5 – “At Pokesdown the old concrete base of the first wooden steps constructed by the Local Board fifteen years ago is some twenty feet from the wall of the cliff…” https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0002177/19060901/115/0005 and Local and District News, Bournemouth, Town Council, Approaches to the Sea, Western Gazette, Friday 9 September 1904, page 3 – “take into consideration at an early date the best means of making a road from the cliff to the beach at Pokesdown. He [Councillor Elcock] referred to the present difficulties of reaching the beach by means of long flights of steps…” https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0000407/19040909/007/0003 and Bournemouth Town Council, Western Gazette, Friday 5 January 1906, page 5 – “works in connection with the proposed approach to the beach at Pokesdown should be proceeded with forthwith” https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0000407/19060105/029/0005 and The Undercliff Drive, Bournemouth Guardian, Saturday 21 April 1906, page 5 – referred to as “the new path way” https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0002177/19060421/099/0005

151. Church of England Parish Map https://hub.arcgis.com/datasets/67bce0ed36dd4ee0af7a16bc079aa09a as of 28/04/2021

152. Local Government Boundary Commission, New electoral arrangements for Bournemouth, Poole and Christchurch, final recommendations, October 2018, page 21:

“Three local residents proposed that our Boscombe East ward be named ‘Pokesdown’ whilst Councillor A. Jones suggested ‘Boscombe East & Pokesdown’. Again, with the benefit of our visit to the area, we have accepted Councillor Jones’ suggestion and recommend Boscombe East & Pokesdown ward accordingly.”

http://www.wcresidents.co.uk/Pages/Boundaries_Commission_Report_1810.pdf as of 28/04/2021

and Indices of Deprivation map http://dclgapps.communities.gov.uk/imd/iod_index.html as of 28/04/2021

153. Map of suburb or district of Pokesdown today (2021) – photos of Bournemouth/BCP Council ‘Pokesdown’ road signs taken by me (Michelle Fogg) walking around the area in March 2021. I couldn’t find any markers or signs for the “northern” boundary of Pokesdown, but I am basing Pokesdown’s reach north on a map which was available in March 2021 (but which I can’t re-find online now, April 2021) which showed the ‘Lower-layer Super Output Area’ code E01015276 is called Pokesdown Station, Boscombe East. The boundary of this takes in Warwick Road to Rebbeck Road to Kings Park Drive. Here is a zoomed-in screen grab of it:

Here is the full map, converted from pdf to jpeg:

The LSOA ‘5276 Pokesdown Station’ also traces the northern boundary of the Boscombe East & Pokesdown ward boundary.

I included the St. James’ church welcome sign on the modern-day district map as it was this same church which gave rise to the original “official” boundaries of a Pokesdown, the ecclesiastical parish boundary, in 1859.

154. the “Venn-diagram” map of four different boundaries! sources as above, combined.

155. change the url to which postcode you want to see on a map: https://www.getthedata.com/postcode/BH6/where-is-BH6

The copy and paste citation for this page: The History of Rosebery Park Baptist Church and Pokesdown, Sources of Information. Author: Michelle Fogg. Date: June 2021. Url: https://roseberypark.org/history/sources-of-information/