Sources of Information

History of Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The Full Story

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  1. Young, J.A. (1997) Pokesdown Past 1750 to 1900. Bournemouth Local Studies Publications, No. 737. ISBN 1 873887 12 4. Page 20.
  2. Gannaway, Norman (2009) William Pickford – A Biography. Hampshire Football Association Limited. Using PDF version from https://www.hampshirefa.com/about/history as of 17/03/2021. Pages 2 and 3.
  3. Young, Pokesdown Past, page 26.
  4. Young, J.A. (1993) Boscombe the Victorian Heritage. Bournemouth Local Studies Publications, No. 724. ISBN 0 906287 99 5. Page 12.
  5. Mate, Charles Henry (1910) Bournemouth: 1810-1910, the history of a modern health and pleasure resort. Original publisher Mate & Sons Ltd. Using e-book version from Dalcassian Publishing Company purchased at https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Charles_Henry_Mate_Bournemouth_1810_1910_the_histo?id=hxnUDwAAQBAJ as of 13/03/2021. Page 157 (or page 198 on PDF version).
  6. Young, Boscombe the Victorian Heritage, page 48.
table showing Population figures Pokesdown and Boscombe 1861 to 1901

7. Young, Boscombe the Victorian Heritage, page 12.

8. Young, David S. (1957) The Story of Bournemouth. Robert Hale Limited. Plate 34, between pages 160 and 161. Young offers the explanation about this picture: “The Ragged Cat (Palmerston Arms), c.1860. Several variations of this picture are in existence all apparently copied from a common original. This reproduction is from an oil painting executed in 1895 by W. Stevens and now [as of 1957] in the possession of the Bournemouth Public Libraries.”

9. Young, Pokesdown Past, page 32.

10. Young, Boscombe the Victorian Heritage, page 6.


11. Map showing the building estates:

Young, J.A. (1993) Boscombe the Victorian Heritage.

1865 Boscombe Estate No. 1 – page 50

1866 -1868 Boscombe Spa Estate – page 52 and 9

1875 Enclosure Lot 228 – page 53 and 12

1876 The Freemantle Estate – page 54 and 14

1881 The Hengistbourne Estate  – page 55 and 19

1884 The Shelley Estate (first instalment) – page 56 and 20

1886 The Verno Estate – page 57 and 21

1887 Boscombe Estate No. 2 (the former Clinigan Trust Land) – page 58 and 25

1887 Boscombe Manor Estate – page 59 and 25

Late 1880s Palmerston Estate – page 21

1877 Shaftesbury Estate – page 22

1888-89 Shelley Estate (next instalments) – page 25


Young, Pokesdown Past 1750 to 1900.

1857 the first estate – page 32

1877 The Boscombe Park Estate. Expanded July 1890 and May 1903 – page 37 to 38

1887 The Rosebery Park Estate – page 34 to 36

1884 The Eastbourne Park Estate – page 36 to 37

1892 Clarence Park Estate – page 39 to 40

1892 Priory View Estate – page 40 to 41

1890-93 Stourfield Estate – page 51 to 52

1894 Stourwood Estate – page 53 to 54


Godfrey, Alan (1992) Boscombe & Pokesdown 1923 Old Ordnance Survey Maps. Hampshire Sheet 86.10, The Godfrey Edition. Published by Alan Godfrey. Reprinted by courtesy of the Trustees of the National Library of Scotland. ISBN 0 85054 479 3. Christchurch History Society have got it listed as license Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial.


12. Young, Pokesdown Past, page 33.

13. http://www.south-central-media.co.uk/capital/vic-intro/vic-intro.htm on Charles Henry Mate, under paragraph ‘Wm Mate & Sons [William Mate 1826-1907] Publishers & Booksellers’ as of 13/03/2021

14. Mate, Charles Henry (1910) Bournemouth: 1810-1910, the history of a modern health and pleasure resort. Original publisher Mate & Sons Ltd. Using e-book version from Dalcassian Publishing Company purchased at https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Charles_Henry_Mate_Bournemouth_1810_1910_the_histo?id=hxnUDwAAQBAJ as of 13/03/2021. Page 156 – 157 (or page 197 – 198 on PDF version).


15. Timeline (1):

1867 Pokesdown is a thriving village, Boscombe is a nearby hamlet – Young, Pokesdown Past. Page 20.

1871 Pokesdown population 511 – Young, Pokesdown Past. Page 26.

1874 Boscombe Baptist Church established July 1874, chapel built on corner of Palmerston and Gladstone Road, held its first service March 1875 – Young, Boscombe the Victorian Heritage, page 29-30.

1876 Freemantle Estate built – Young, Boscombe the Victorian Heritage, page 54 and 14.

1877 Boscombe, Pokesdown & Springbourne Infirmary opened – the new permanent home of The Dispensary, to assist poorer people obtain treatment and medicines, plus accomodation for twelve patients. This Infirmary was the nucleus of Boscombe Hospital. – Young, Boscombe the Victorian Heritage, page 15-16.

1881 Pokesdown population 1,231 – Young, Pokesdown Past. Page 77.

1886 Railway station opened at Pokesdown, but called “Boscombe Station” – Young, Pokesdown Past. Page 45: “Construction of the station was commenced early in 1886, and this was opened on 1 July 1886. It consisted of an ‘island’ platform situated between the two pairs of running rails, and was about 600 feet long. Access was from the centre of the road bridge, down a covered stairway of forty steps. The station was named Boscombe, and did not become Pokesdown until the opening of the new Boscombe Station in Ashley Road in 1897.”

1886 horse-drawn omnibus route extended to Pokesdown – Young, Pokesdown Past. Page 45: “Following the opening of the station. Mr H.F. Beamish commenced in October 1886 to run a ‘new and splendid Garden-seated Pair-Horsed Omnibus’ between the Station and the Square in Bournemouth. There were five buses each way on weekdays… it seated ten inside and ten outside passengers…”

1887 Rosebery Park Estate built – Young, Pokesdown Past. Page 24 to 36.

1887 Queen Victoria – Young, Pokesdown Past. Page 50.

1888 first electricity in Bournemouth – “Education”, Streets of Bournemouth series, page 48. https://www.streets-of-bournemouth.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Education.pdf as of 01/04/2021

1889 Freemantle Baptist Mission Chapel opened – Young, Boscombe the Victorian Heritage, page 31 (see no.19 and 20 below for more information)

1891 Pokesdown population 3,033 – Young, Pokesdown Past. Page 77.

1891 Rosebery Park Baptist Church formed – Jeans, Robert J (1991) Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Centenary 1891-1991. Christchurch History Society reference number CHS017431 and also at Pokesdown, Rosebery Park Baptist Church. Pages 5 and 6. Also Young, Pokesdown Past. Pages 60 and 61.

1892 Rosebery Park Baptist Chapel built – Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Pages 6 and 7. Also Young, Pokesdown Past. Pages 60 and 61. And Pokesdown. Building a New Mission Hall. Christchurch Times, Saturday 30 April 1892, page 5, from https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/BL/0002170/18920430/048/0005

1894 to 1895 Lord Rosebery is Prime Minister – https://www.gov.uk/government/history/past-prime-ministers/archibald-primrose-5th-earl-of-rosebery as of 01/04/2021

1895 to 1901 Pokesdown is an Urban District Council – Young, Pokesdown Past. Pages 80 and 81.

1897 Boscombe Station opens on Ashley Road. Original Boscombe Station renamed Pokesdown – Quick, Michael (September 2020) Railway Passenger Stations in Great Britain: A Chronology. Fifth edition. Version 5.02. Railway and Canal Historical Society. Using PDF version from https://rchs.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/Railway-Passenger-Stations-v5.02.pdf as of 01/04/2021 Page 345.

1898 Pokesdown Science, Art & Technical School built – Young, Pokesdown Past. Pages 71 and 72.

1898 Pokesdown population 4,927 – Young, Pokesdown Past. Page 66.


16. “The Freemantle Estate” was built there in 1876, and Young, Boscombe the Victorian Heritage, page 14, writes: “It may be noted that the name Freemantle was for the next thirty or more years used for the general neighbourhood”. How long was the name “Freemantle” in use? Young says that by 1917 the name of “Freemantle” for the surrounding district had dropped out of general use (Pokesdown Past, page 64-65), but the name “Freemantle” still appears on the 1923 Godfrey edition Boscombe & Pokesdown map.

17. From https://forebears.io/england/hampshire/bournemouth/freemantle as of 31/03/2021

18. Young, Boscombe the Victorian Heritage, page 29-30.

19. Young, Boscombe the Victorian Heritage, page 31: “A Baptist mission chapel was opened in Christchurch Road on 10th September 1889, having been built by Mr G. Mitchell in corrugated iron. It was situated between Somerset and Warwick Roads, where the present Rosebery Park Baptist Church now stands, and was intended to serve the rapidly increasing population of Freemantle, Rosebery Park and Boscombe Park.”

20. “Boscombe. New Baptist Chapel at Freemantle”, Bournemouth Guardian, 14/09/1889. From https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0002176/18890914/068/0005

21. Young, Boscombe the Victorian Heritage, page 23, says: “Building of Freemantle Mission Hall in Somerset Road was started in December 1884… opened on 8th April 1885, the Hall was extended two years later, and the opening service for the extension took place on 31st May 1887.” Then Young, Pokesdown Past, page 64-65 provides this information: The Mission Room in Somerset Place, Freemantle, was re-purposed as the Freemantle School in April 1897. In 1917 it was renamed Somerset Road C. of E. School, as by that date the name of Freemantle for the surrounding district had dropped out of general use. The school was closed in 1922.

22. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Pages 6 and 7. Also Young, Pokesdown Past. Pages 60 and 61. And Pokesdown. Building a New Mission Hall. Christchurch Times, Saturday 30 April 1892, page 5, from https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/BL/0002170/18920430/048/0005


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23. Background map: Godfrey, Alan (1992) Boscombe & Pokesdown 1923 Old Ordnance Survey Maps. Hampshire Sheet 86.10, The Godfrey Edition. Published by Alan Godfrey. Reprinted by courtesy of the Trustees of the National Library of Scotland. ISBN 0 85054 479 3. Christchurch History Society have got it listed as license Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial.

Information of positions of church and Rosebery Park Estate:

Freemantle – From https://forebears.io/england/hampshire/bournemouth/freemantle as of 31/03/2021.

Position of Freemantle Baptist Mission – Young, Boscombe the Victorian Heritage, page 31.

Start of Rosebery Park Baptist Church – meeting at Livingstone Road, then building the chapel – Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Pages 6 and 7. Also Young, Pokesdown Past. Pages 60 and 61. And Pokesdown. Building a New Mission Hall. Christchurch Times, Saturday 30 April 1892, page 5, from https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/BL/0002170/18920430/048/0005

Rosebery Park Estate – Young, Pokesdown Past, pages 34 to 36.


24. Young, Pokesdown Past, page 33.

25. Streets of Bournemouth: Bournemouth’s Buildings, pages 20, and 22 to 23. From https://www.streets-of-bournemouth.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Bournemouths.Buildings.pdf as of 03/04/2021

26. Butterfield, David, British Street Names, from The Spectator magazine 11 August 2018. Found at https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/british-street-names as of 03/04/2021

27. https://www.gov.uk/government/history/past-prime-ministers/archibald-primrose-5th-earl-of-rosebery as of 01/04/2021

28. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Morley_(MP) and Young, Pokesdown Past, page 35.

29. Young, Pokesdown Past, page 35.

30. Go-Ahead Bournemouth. Beautiful Beyond Any Seaside Place. Bournemouth Daily Echo, Wednesday 22 August 1900, page 2. From https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0000638/19000822/038/0002 as of 03/04/2021

31. Wills, E.G. (1980) Pokesdown and Neighbourhood 1895 to 1910: A Memoir. Bournemouth Local Studies Publications, No. 618. ISBN 0 906287 04 9. Fourth impression. Pages 3 to 5.

32. Wills, Pokesdown and Neighbourhood, page 8.


33. 1898 map showing Rosebery Park Estate and local landmarks from over the years:

The background map is a copy of the ‘Pokesdown in 1898’ map in the centre of the Wills, Pokesdown and Neighbourhood booklet.

Rosebery Park Estate boundary is from Young, Pokesdown Past, page 36.

Position of Dr Dickie’s house, ‘Windermere’ is shown on map of Rosebery Park Estate, Young, Pokesdown Past, page 36.

Original station entrance – from Grant Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/bournemouth_grant/7690249002

and https://www.flickr.com/photos/bournemouth_grant/7758923924/in/photostream/

Pokesdown Fire Station – Grant Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/bournemouth_grant/7758865066/in/photostream/

Astoria Cinema – http://primolux.co.uk/astoria_pokesdown.htm

The Bell Inn – Grant Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/bournemouth_grant/7758763588/in/photostream/

The original Rosebery Park Baptist Chapel – Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Pages 6 and 7. Also Young, Pokesdown Past. Pages 60 and 61. And Pokesdown. Building a New Mission Hall. Christchurch Times, Saturday 30 April 1892, page 5, from https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/BL/0002170/18920430/048/0005

I don’t know where the name “Lockyer Hall” comes from or when it started being used. My theories include: maybe after the chapel was extended in 1897 and 1925 it had a specific hall part that was called Lockyer Hall. Maybe the Deaf Club were hiring this to use for meetings before they bought the chapel building in 1952, and decided to keep using the address Lockyer Hall for the whole of the chapel? https://salixembroidery.co.uk/club/bournemouth-deaf-club/ says “The Bournemouth Deaf Club have been meeting at the Lockyer Hall since the 1940’s”. Alwyn Ladell on Flickr has a leaflet from the Deaf Club from the 1970s with the name Lockyer Hall on it: https://www.flickr.com/photos/alwyn_ladell/34837146071/in/album-72157624460965785/ . The NHS Service Directory is still giving Lockyer Hall as the address of the Bournemouth Deaf Club as of 22/03/2021 https://www.nhs.uk/services/service-directory/bournemouth-deaf-club/N10497214 . But Turning Point Church, who have been using the chapel for their Sunday services since 01/07/2018, use the address “27a Morley Road” and don’t call it Lockyer Hall.

I haven’t found any information on the origins of the name “Lockyer Hall”. Does the name Lockyer come from a local person or family? I found this family tree at https://www.ancestry.co.uk/family-tree/person/tree/20195295/person/192245028450/story but I have no evidence of any of these Lockyers being involved with the church, or NOT involved with the church.

The name “Rev. Lockyer” appears in some newspaper stories, 1890s-1910s, but these are in relation to the Congregational church.

A reference is made to “Widow Lockyer of Pokesdown Farm” being left an annuity on the death of the Countess of Strathmore and Kinghorne, Mary Eleanor Bowes, who dies at Stourfield House on 28th April 1800 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Bowes,_Countess_of_Strathmore_and_Kinghorne#:~:text=She%20also%20left%20an%20annuity%20for%20the%20widow%20Lockyer%20of%20Pokesdown%20Farm.

Or one theory I had was that it was named after a famous Victorian, in the manner of the surrounding roads. Perhaps the scientists, Sir Norman Lockyer? See https://www.nature.com/articles/137809a0 . This Lockyer did know the Morley after whom Morley Road is named, they moved in the same circles. But it would seem odd to name a part of a Baptist church after an Anglican. Unless the name was applied to the building in the style of the surrounding roads, but after the church was sold to the Deaf Club in 1952?

Or maybe the Deaf Club gave it the name Lockyer Hall after someone in their group, or after someone they admired?

If anyone has any information about the name Lockyer Hall for the old chapel in Morley Road, Pokesdown, please let us know!

Science, Art & Technical School – photo – Alwyn Ladell Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/alwyn_ladell/8110372753/

Tram/trolleybus Depot – photo by Ken Mantock http://pokesdowncommunityforum.org.uk/history/pokesdown-trolleybus-depot-steptoe-and-son/ and information from Grant Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/bournemouth_grant/6511846713

Picture of Bournemouth Corporation tram from postcard Alwyn Ladell Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/alwyn_ladell/5559482578/in/album-72157626220719617/

Picture of steam train (random, not Bournemouth-specific) from https://www.cleanpng.com/png-rail-transport-train-steam-locomotive-train-steam-72305/

Picture of horse from https://www.freepngs.com/horse-pngs

Picture of cow from https://pnghut.com/png/XR8ktR853a/cow-background-dairy-cattle-milk-cowgoat-family-transparent-png


34. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Pages 6 and 8.

35. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Pages 8 and 9.

36. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Page 11.

37. Pokesdown. Rosebery Park Baptist Church. Bournemouth Guardian, Saturday 20th October 1906, page 6. From https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/BL/0002177/19061020/132/0006

38. Local Sales of Work. Rosebery Park Baptists. Bournemouth Guardian, Saturday 9th November 1912, page 5 from https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/BL/0002177/19121109/084/0005

39. Rosebery Park Baptists. Annual sale of work at Pokesdown. Bournemouth Guardian, Saturday 31 October 1914, page 6 from https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/BL/0002177/19141031/070/0006

40. Bournemouth Graphic, Friday 29th January 1915, page 5 from https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/BL/0002173/19150129/038/0005

41. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Page 13.

42. Bournemouth Graphic, Friday 25 August 2016, page 6 from https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/BL/0002173/19160825/059/0006 and Friday 18 January 1918, page 2 from https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/BL/0002173/19180118/009/0002


43. Edgington, M.A. (1985) Bournemouth and the First World War: The Evergreen Valley 1914 to 1919. Bournemouth Local Studies Publications, No. 675. ISBN O 906287 57 X. October 2013 PDF edition as available at http://www.blsp.jp137.com/ (Bournemouth Local Studies Publications website) as of 07/03/2021.

16,000 troops – page 7 booklet (page 14 of PDF)

Infantry and mounted men – page 4 booklet (page 11 of PDF)

Troops from New Zealand – page 51 booklet (page 58 of PDF)

Iford encampment – page 56 booklet (page 63 of PDF)

New YMCA hut – page 7 booklet (page 14 of PDF)

Bournemouth War Hospital Wood Work Depot – page 77 & 78 booklet (page 84 & 85 of PDF)

Empire Club for girls – page 14 booklet (page 21 of PDF)


44. The Rev. W.H. Perkins, M.A. Farewell Meeting at Pokesdown. Bournemouth Guardian, Saturday 5th October 1918, page 4 from https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/BL/0002177/19181005/043/0004

45. The Education of Pokesdown. A Story of 22 Years. Mr G. Payne – His Work and Ideals. Bournemouth Guardian, 2nd July 1921, page 7 from https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/BL/0002177/19210702/117/0007

45a. Editor Peter Gould. Bournemouth Corporation Transport: The Trams and Trolleybuses. The Local Transport History Library. 2021. Page 6 and 7. from http://www.lthlibrary.org.uk/library/PDF-195-1.pdf as of 12/04/2021

46. Jeans, Rosebery Park Baptist Church: The First Hundred Years. Pages 12 and 13.


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47.